List O Mania: Australia Edition

When it comes to lists, most of the ones I’ve blogged about so far are all US based.

What about the lists from other countries? Yes, they can sometimes be frustrating because the books aren’t here yet; but sometimes they are. Or they tell us authors and titles to watch for.

So, from Australia (and thanks to Adele from the Centre for Youth Literature, State Library of Victoria, for the reminder).

Inky Awards. It is Australia’s first national teen choice awards for young adult literature; more information here. There is a “Golden Inky” for an Australian author; and a “Silver Inky” for an International Author.

From the Center for Youth Literature website, the shortlists; and I’ve noted the winners:

Gold Inky shortlist (Australian novels)

Shift by Em Bailey, Hardy Grant Egmont : the Winner!

Night Beach by Kirsty Eagar, Penguin Books Australia

Act of Faith by Kelly Gardiner, Harper Collins

Queen of the Night by Leanne Hall, Text Publishing

The Reluctant Hallelujah by Gabrielle Williams, Puffin Books Australia

Silver Inky shortlist (international novels)

BZRK by Michael Grant, Egmont Books

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, Penguin Books : the Winner!

Why We Broke Up by Daniel Handler, Hardie Grant. From my review: “Min Green and Ed Slaterton have broken up. She gives him a box: a box, full of objects from the time they dated, from October 5 to November 12. The arty girl (no, don’t call her that) and the jock. Along with the box is a letter, Min’s letter to Ed, explaining — why we broke up. Explaining to Ed, explaining to herself, why they got together and why they broke up. This is Min’s story, her long, glorious, honest letter to Ed about how and why they got together, and fell in love, despite — or maybe because of — being so different. Ed, a jock, popular; Min, who loves old films and coffee with friends.”

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness, Walker Books. From my review: “The monster showed up just after midnight. As they do.” One night, a monster visits thirteen year old Conor O’Malley. He will make three more visits to Conor, then demand something in return. The next morning, Conor is not sure whether the visit of the monster yew tree was real or a dream. Real life is nightmare enough. His mother is ill. His father is in America with his new family and rarely visits. His grandmother is formal and distant. At school, he’s the boy whose mother is ill. At best, he’s whispered about. At worst, he’s the target of bullies. And now the monster visits nightly at 12:07. Demanding what Conor cannot give.”


Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year awards
; for Older Readers, the Winner and Honour Books:Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor, Hodder. From my review: “Daughter of Smoke and Bone is stunning — I’ve never read anything quite like it. Taylor tells us, up front, “once upon a time, an angel and a devil fell in love. It did not end well.” Talk about your spoilers! And this illustrates why spoilers don’t matter — yes, there will be an angel. There will be a devil. They will fall in love; the reader even knows how it will end. The entire plot is given away before the story even begins. Yet, still, the reader turns the pages, wondering, who is the angel? Who is the devil? How do they even meet to fall in love? What does this have to do with Karou, who lives in Prague and meets her best friend for coffee and picks the wrong boyfriend, yet also knocks on a normal-looking door and enters the mysterious workshop of Brimstone, a world where wishes come true for a price, and the price is teeth. Oh, what does Brimstone do with all those teeth.”

Winner: The Dead I Know by Scot Gardner, Allen & Unwin

Honours: A Straight Line To My Heart by Bill Condon, Allen & Unwin and When We Were Two by Robert Newton, Penguin Books, Penguin Group (Australia)

And other CBC Awards to check out at their webpage.

Prime Minister’s Literary Awards; the 2012 Winner for Young Adult Fiction was When We Were Two by Robert Newton

The Aurealis Awardfor speculative fiction; the 2012 finalists will be announced in March and the winner by May. The 2011 Young Adult Novel winner was Only Ever Always, by Penni Russon.

 

List O Mania: Cybils

The Cybils winners have been announced!

As a reminder, the Cybils is the Children’s and Young Adult Blogger’s Literary Awards. As explained at its website, the Cybils have two purposes; first, recognize children and teen books that “combine the highest literary merit and “kid appeal.”” Second, “foster a sense of community among bloggers who write about children’s and YA literature.”

The full list of 2012 Cybils winners is at the website. Cybils have a variety of topics and age levels; as usual, I’m highlighting the YA titles.

Nonfiction: Bomb: The Race to Build–and Steal–the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon By Steve Sheinkin, Flash Point. From my review: “One nice thing about non-fiction titles: they tell you up front what a book will be about. This is about the invention of the atomic bomb, told through three stories: the scientific journey from the discovery of nuclear fission to the creation of and use of the atomic bomb; the spy story, as various people in different countries provide information on the American program to the USSR; and the military story, as commandos worked behind enemy lines in Nazi held Europe to stop the Nazis from being the first to create an atomic bomb.”

Graphic Novels: Friends with Boys by Faith Erin Hicks, First Second Books

Fantasy & Science Fiction: Seraphina by Rachel Hartman, Random House Books for Young Readers. From my review: “Seraphina’s world: What is her world, exactly? The book begins just a few weeks after she joins the royal household, but soon it’s learned that this is Seraphina’s first steps outside her family. Seraphina has tried to keep herself away, hidden, at arm’s length from others to protect her secret. She doesn’t always know how to interact with others. I’m sure I’m not the only one who wondered, while reading, if some of Seraphina’s brusqueness was part of her dragon heritage or the result of a deep seated sense of isolation: “I did not understand that I carried loneliness before me on a plate, and that music would be the light illuminating me from behind.” Whatever the reason, she is also a keen observer of people: “He noticed my eyes upon him and ran a hand through his wheaten hair as if to underscore how handsome he was.””

Fiction: Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews, Amulet

And, a big THANK YOU to the Cybils for being so clear that their logo can be used for posts like this and make it so easy to use them. I wish more awards and lists did this!

List O Mania: Stoker Awards

The Horror Writers Association have announced the final ballot for the 2012 Bram Stoker Awards.

The finalists for Superior Achievement in a Young Adult Novel:

Bray, Libba – The Diviners (Little Brown). From my review: “Evie, Evie, Evie. Evie is an interesting girl, throwing herself boldly into the brave new world of the Jazz Age, embracing fashion, hairstyles, music, slang, and attitude. She pushes herself forward almost desperately; running to something because she is running away from something. She is running from her beloved brother’s death in the Great War; she is running from a family that mostly shut down after that death. She is also unsure of her own powers and what they mean, so hey, what better thing to do than find a party and dance and think just about the moment?

Lyga, Barry – I Hunt Killers (Little Brown). From my review: “The concept alone is terrific. The son of a serial killer using his knowledge to hunt other serial killers? A serial killer book for teens? Sign. me. up. What truly rocks is that I Hunt Killers is more than just a cool premise. It is also a fascinating study about choice and dark desires and hope. It is a character study, a study of Jazz, who is doubly cursed by nature and nurture. Is he destined to be a killer because he is the son of a killer? Is he destined to be a killer because he was taught to be a killer?

Maberry, Jonathan – Flesh & Bone (Simon & Schuster)

McCarty, Michael – I Kissed A Ghoul (Noble Romance Publishing)

Stiefvater, Maggie – The Raven Boys (Scholastic Press). From my review: “Blue Sargent, sixteen, is part of a family of psychics in Henrietta, Virginia. Since she can remember, the same prediction has been made about her: she would kill her true love. With a kiss. Blue keeps people at arms length, to make sure that prediction doesn’t come true or is at least delayed. Richard “Dick” Campbell Gansey III attends Aglionby Academy, an exclusive boys school in Henrietta Virginia. He’s on a quest to discover Owen Glendower, a Welsh king who led armies against the English and disappeared in the early fifteenth century. He’s pulled his friends into his search: Ronan, Adam, Noah. Blue stays away boys like Gansey, rich, spoiled, Raven boys. When their paths cross, she knows she should stay away from them. Gansey, rich and driven. Adam, the scholarship student with a chip on his shoulder. Ronan, lost and angry following the death of his father. Noah, quiet, watching, observing. Blue knows she should stay away –  but she cannot help it. The adventure of finding Glendower, of discovering the magic in the world, the laughter and trust of friendship, and, maybe, love. Oh, those Raven boys.”

Strand, Jeff – A Bad Day for Voodoo (Sourcebooks)

The Awards will be presented in June. For the full list, see the Horror Writers Association website.

List O Mania: LA Times Book Prize

The Los Angeles Times has announced it’s finalists for the Book Prizes. The Prizes will be announced in April.

For Young Adult Literature, the Finalists are:

Paolo Bacigalupi / The Drowned Cities (Little, Brown Books For Young Readers)

A.S. King / Ask the Passengers (Little, Brown Books For Young Readers). From my review: “Astrid lives in a small town where everyone knows, or thinks they know, everyone’s business. Everyone judges. So Astrid keeps some things to herself: like that her father is smoking pot. Like how she and her younger sister Ellis are no longer close. Like she’s sure her mother dislikes her. Like Astrid has been kissing Dee, a girl from work. For months. Astrid doesn’t even tell her two close friends at school, Kristina and Justin, which is both amusing and sad because Astrid knows their secret, that the popular, well-liked couple are not really a couple, both are gay, and both are covering for each other because being gay in their small,  perfect town would be impossible. Besides, just because Astrid like kissing Dee, it doesn’t mean she’s gay. So Astrid plays a game, giving love to strangers, staring up at planes and sending love. And the passengers flying over Pennsylvania wonder why suddenly they feel hope, or love, or calmness.

Martine Leavitt / My Book of Life by Angel (Margaret Ferguson Books/Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers)

Matthew Quick / Boy 21 (Little, Brown Books For Young Readers)

Elizabeth Wein / Code Name Verity (Disney-Hyperion). From my review: “Maddie and Queenie become friends, meeting first as wireless operators, staying in touch as their war careers take different paths, Maddie as a pilot and Queenie with the OES. “It’s like being in love, discovering your best friend.” This friendship, this pair — how can you not love them? Love Queenie? And one moment there is laughter in the English countryside as Queenie displays both her ability to get lost and to talk people into doing what she wants, the next the reminder that Queenie is in a Gestapo prison listening to people being tortured, clutching her dirty sweater as if it can somehow make the noise and dirt and blood go away. Somehow, remembering a younger, more naive and sheltered girl telling another, while German bombs fall during the Battle of Britain, “‘Kiss me, Hardy!’ Weren’t those Nelson’s last words at the Battle of Trafalgar? Don’t cry. We’re still alive and we make a sensational team,” somehow, that makes Queenie hold on just a little bit longer as she writes to explain herself and what she has done.”

(The above list from the LA Times Book Prize website).

 

List O Mania: Andre Norton Award

Thanks to all the suggestions and reminders of various lists and awards the feature young adult books!

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, Inc., have announced the 2012 Nebula Award Nominees, including the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy.

Twelve titles were nominated; the winner will be announced in May. This list is from that announcement. I’ve included links to the ones I’ve read.

Iron Hearted Violet, Kelly Barnhill (Little, Brown)

Black Heart, Holly Black (S&S/McElderry; Gollancz). From my review: “Cassel Sharpe, 17, couldn’t stay out of trouble if he wanted to. (Now that’s a question; given his talents, his family, and his background, does he want to?) The Feds are forgiving his past crimes if he works for them, using his unique talent as a transformation worker, someone who can transform whatever he touches. His mother is in big trouble with the local crime boss, and all will be forgiven if Cassel does him one little favor. Cassel knows there is no such thing as one favor. It’s complicated by the fact that neither the mob nor the feds can now he’s working for the other. Oh, and another thing — the crime boss just happens to be the father of the girl Cassel loves. Just to make things all that more simple — not — Cassel has to worry about his senior year in high school. Classes, avoiding demerits, friends, and a possible blackmail scheme. It’s all in a day’s work for someone with a black heart like Cassel.”

Above, Leah Bobet (Levine)

The Diviners, Libba Bray (Little, Brown; Atom). From my review: “The Diviners is a supernatural story set in the Roaring Twenties. Evie is the main character, yes; but she’s only one of the main characters. Once in New York, she meets her uncle’s assistant, Jericho, reunites with best friend, Mabel, becomes friends with Theta, a Ziefgeld Girl, and Theta’s roommate Henry; and crosses paths with a pickpocket, Sam. At the same time, we learn about Memphis, a numbers runner in Harlem. In a way, Bray is establishing a Team; but (since it’s Bray) it’s not as simple as bringing a Team together. Bray doesn’t do anything as expected as having these teenagers (and all of them are about seventeen years old) meeting and sharing their secrets with each other by page 110. Heck, it’s not even as simple as Evie and the others meeting each other; there are crossed paths and missed meetings. In other words, it’s a cast of characters who are unexpected and fresh and delicious, both in who they are but also in how they related to each other, even when they don’t know it.”

Vessel, Sarah Beth Durst (S&S/McElderry)

Seraphina, Rachel Hartman (Random House Children’s Books; Doubleday UK). From my review: “Seraphina’s world: What is her world, exactly? The book begins just a few weeks after she joins the royal household, but soon it’s learned that this is Seraphina’s first steps outside her family. Seraphina has tried to keep herself away, hidden, at arm’s length from others to protect her secret. She doesn’t always know how to interact with others. I’m sure I’m not the only one who wondered, while reading, if some of Seraphina’s brusqueness was part of her dragon heritage or the result of a deep seated sense of isolation: “I did not understand that I carried loneliness before me on a plate, and that music would be the light illuminating me from behind.” Whatever the reason, she is also a keen observer of people: “He noticed my eyes upon him and ran a hand through his wheaten hair as if to underscore how handsome he was.”

Enchanted, Alethea Kontis (Harcourt)

Every Day, David Levithan (Knopf Books for Young Readers)

Summer of the Mariposas, Guadalupe Garcia McCall (Tu Books)

Railsea, China Miéville (Del Rey; Macmillan)

Fair Coin, E.C. Myers (Pyr)

Above World, Jenn Reese (Candlewick)