ALA: ARCs

One of the panel discussions I was on at ALA was All About ARCs:  “Librarians may have heard of Advanced Reading Copies (ARCs), but do they actually know how to acquire or use them? Why do publishers create these unsaleable copies? Have you seen them at used bookstores, Friends book sales, and should they really be there? What about those “digital galleys” that are becoming available? Come explore these questions and more with a panel of librarians and publishing reps who use them every day in many ways. Discussion topics: What are ARCs?; Who is the intended audience of an ARC?; Why do publishers provide them?; How can you get them?; Digital vs. Print?; What you can/cannot do with an ARC.”

Also on the panel: fellow librarians Kelly Jensen and Kristi Chadwick; and, from the publisher side, Jen Childs (Random House) and Victoria Stapleton (Little, Brown). (Can I mention again how much I love social media for being able to connect people? Because both Kelly and Kristi are people I met online; our whole presentation was organized online.)

I’m going to keep my post on this brief, because Kelly did an incredible write up at her blog, Stacked Books. With graphs!

I will say that this is an area near and dear to my heart. I remember at my first BEA and ALA being overwhelmed; taking so much; and thinking that an ARC was no different from a finished book. Thankfully, I’ve grown smarter. Both of those first conferences were things I thought I’d never attend again, for instance. I’ve learned to say “no” and to take notes about titles. (I also realize I’m privileged, in that, having done this for so many years, I’ve got contacts that I can directly ask for review copies. Still, I love being on the floor and seeing the ARCs and talking with the publishers, to find out what they are excited about to and make notes to organize my reading). I also love using the ARCs with readers.

What we spoke about, roughly:

What is an ARC and why do publishers create and distribute ARCs? (Jen and Victoria covered this area, and I found it very interesting. Like, that fewer ARCs are being made. And while I knew that ARCs cost more to make than the finished book, I didn’t know why.

How do you get ARCs? Kelly spoke about this, including using reporting back on a survey we did of librarians and bloggers

What do you do with ARCs? More Kelly, and more graphs

Digital galleys? Kristi spoke towards this, primarily NetGalley and Edelweiss, and I know I need to be using this more. Given the cost of production, digital galleys are going to become more and more popular.

What can/can you not do with an ARC? Kelly spoke about this, again with the survey results. I also chimed in, emphasizing this issue from the point of view not of the publisher (who is thinking, of course, “lost sale”) but from the fact that including an ARC in a collection is making a fraudulent representation to the reader. Other points I made: the real-life example of my niece relying on reading an ARC for a school assignment and getting something wrong because the story had changed between ARC and book. That because an ARC isn’t a book it’s quite OK to throw in the recycle bin after it’s been used.

We also had some great questions from the audience, such as what will be the impact on teen reading programs in libraries once ARCs go away.

I known this is concise, but if you have any questions, let me know!

And if there are any other posts about our presentation, let me know and I’ll link it.

ALA: New Adult

And SexyTimes was had by all!

Um, no, not really, but based on the twitter stream for the New Adult Conversation Starter that Sophie Brookover, Kelly Jensen and myself did (Twitter hashtag #ALA13NA), I apparently used that term a lot.

As a recap, the three of us did a Conversation Starter on New Adult Fiction at ALA. I am so pleased to say that it was a packed house. (Thanks to Tiff Emerick for the photo of the session.)

From the start, we wanted this to be a true “conversation” so there was no PowerPoint; there was no formal talk; there wasn’t even any “answers,” rather just a lot of things to consider. We did a lot of conversing about it!

And, we had a song. The lovely and talented Julie Jurgens wrote and sang a song for our program! (You may know Julie from her blog, Hi Miss Julie, and on Twitter she is also @himissjulie).

As a reminder, out description for the conversation starter: New Adult Fiction (NA) has made waves in the New York Times, the Guardian, Publishers Weekly, and more. Depending on who you ask, NA either demands its own section of the library or is just a new name to describe books about twenty-somethings, which libraries have always carried. Maybe it’s “young adult books with sex.” Maybe it’s books about emerging adults trying to figure out the world before an uncertain future happens. Join a lively discussion on what NA may be, who’s reading it, where it’s shelved, how we catalog it, and how it fits into reader’s advisory.

Since we have all, at one time or another, been in sessions that didn’t do what they said they would, we wanted to include all these points and questions.

Our rough outline of what we spoke about:

— definitions of “New Adult”

— Some of the current NA books, touching a bit on self publishing and traditional publishing

— Who is reading it?

— Shelving: Are libraries buying it (with a side of if it’s self published, maybe not) and where is it being shelved

— How it fits Readers Advisory and reaching readers

We also spoke about various issues we have, such as whether it’s a genre or category; whether it’s something with it’s own shelf or area in the library; the problems with the term “New Adult’ when searching for information/collection information; library-land terms of art versus what readers or authors of NA use for terms; the NA books we’ve read; the interaction with Young Adult.

We compiled a list of New Adult Resources at our joint ReadAdv blog. Kelly at Stacked has used the “New Adult” tag on all her posts that discuss this. And Sophie put together a Storify of the Tweets that were going on during the session, to give you a bit of a flavor of how the conversation went.

Since we don’t have a PowerPoint, etc., I’ll link to posts I find about the panel; not so much to be “me me me” but in order to give you different perspectives and information about the program. I’ll edit this post to add more, as I find them.

My ALA: what I saw, did, and learned by Maureen at By Singing Light

Edited to add:

Cloud Unbound Heather’s write up is especially awesome because she didn’t even get to attend! But she participated in a lot of our conversations before ALA, and followed along with the panel thanks to the hashtag.

New Adult: It’s Not Just the Sexytimes at The Sassy Librarian

New Adult by Hannah Gomez at The Yalsa Hub

Brief Overview of the Past Week at Miss Tiff Reads

 

 

 

ALA may be over, but the conversation continues. It’s going to be interesting, to see how “New Adult” evolves (or not) over the coming years. And if you have any questions, or comments, or suggestions about New Adult, please share!

ALA

ALA Annual is just around the corner, which means, OH NO SO MUCH TO DO.

The highlights of my schedule, so far:

Saturday, June 29th

All About ARCs: The Ins and Outs of Requesting, Using and Abusing Advanced Reading Copies, where I’m co-presenting with Kelly Jensen and Kristi Chadwick. 10:30 to 11:30, McCormick Place Convention Center, S103d.

From the program: “Librarians may have heard of Advanced Reading Copies (ARCs), but do they actually know how to acquire or use them? Why do publishers create these unsaleable copies? Have you seen them at used bookstores, Friends book sales, and should they really be there? What about those “digital galleys” that are becoming available? Come explore these questions and more with a panel of librarians and publishing reps who use them every day in many ways. Discussion topics: What are ARCs?; Who is the intended audience of an ARC?; Why do publishers provide them?; How can you get them?; Digital vs. Print?; What you can/cannot do with an ARC.”

Kristi, Kelly and I are working on this right now. I have THOUGHTS and FEELINGS about ARCs, and libraries, and librarians, and all the things! Including not just what people do (or don’t do) with them, but in how people view them and their use as part of one’s whole professional tool kit.

Fabulous Films for Young Adults, 1:00 to 4:00, Hilton Chicago, Pullman Boardman. This is a committee meeting, but Fab Films is an open committee.

Sunday, June 30th

 YA Author Coffee Klatch, 9:00 to 10:00, McCormack Place Convention Center, S406b. Ticketed event.

From the program: “Enjoy coffee and meet with YALSA’s award winning authors! This informal coffee klatch will give you an opportunity to meet authors who have appeared on one of YALSA’s six annual selected lists or have received one of YALSA’s five literary awards. Librarians will sit at a table and every 3 or 4 minutes, a new author will arrive at your table to talk!
I’ve managed to go to almost all of these, and while one should bring their own bagel or pastry, what one really goes for is is the chance to talk with and meet the authors.

Monday, July 1st

Conversation Starters: New Adult Fiction: What is it and is it really happening? 9:15 – 10:00, McCormick Place Convention Center, S102d. I’m co-presenting with Sophie Brookover and Kelly Jensen.

From the program: “New Adult Fiction (NA) has made waves in the New York Times, the Guardian, Publishers Weekly, and more. Depending on who you ask, NA either demands its own section of the library or is just a new name to describe books about twenty-somethings, which libraries have always carried. Maybe it’s “young adult books with sex.” Maybe it’s books about emerging adults trying to figure out the world before an uncertain future happens. Join a lively discussion on what NA may be, who’s reading it, where it’s shelved, how we catalog it, and how it fits into reader’s advisory.

Part of the reason I’m enjoying putting together this Conversation Starter is that, while online New Adult has been talked about for a while, most people I talk with in libraryland haven’t heard about it. I think this is a great opportunity to connect with patrons who are twentysomething.

Michael L. Printz Program and Reception, 8:00 to 11:00, Hyatt Regency Chicago, Grand AB. Ticketed Event.

This is always so much fun! This year, though, I’ve only read 3 of the 5 books. I don’t have copies of Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe or The White Bicycle, and I’ve been so busy with things that borrowing a library copy hasn’t worked out. Maybe I’ll have time in the next couple weeks.

So, those are some of things I’m doing and looking forward to!

What about you? What are you plans for ALA Annual?

ALA 2013 Conversation Starters!

Dear ALA Members:

Now is the time to vote! To vote for what you want to have happen at ALA Annual!

As explained at this ALA News Press Release, voting is open until March 31, 2013 for Conversation Starters and Ignite Sessions.

“Conversation Starters” are “fast-paced 45-minute sessions intended to jumpstart conversations and highlight emerging topics and trends.”  Go here to read the proposals and vote for them.

“Ignite Sessions” “give presenters five minutes to share what they’re most passionate about in the library world and inspire an audience to join them. Ignite speakers present for exactly five minutes, accompanied by 20 slides. Each slide is displayed for 15 seconds, with slides advancing automatically.” Go here to read the proposals and vote for them.

You can vote for as many as you want.

These votes will count towards 30 percent of the selection process. Staff votes and an advisory group count for the remaining 70 percent of the decision.

Kelly Jensen of Stacked and my co-author Sophie Brookover and I have submitted a Conversation Starter, New Adult Fiction: What Is It and Is It Really Happening? “New Adult Fiction (NA) has made waves in the New York Times, the Guardian, Publishers Weekly, and more. Depending on who you ask, NA either demands its own section of the library or is just a new name to describe books about twenty-somethings, which libraries have always carried. Maybe it’s “young adult books with sex.” Maybe it’s books about emerging adults trying to figure out the world before an uncertain future happens. Join a lively discussion on what NA may be, who’s reading it, where it’s shelved, how we catalog it, and how it fits into reader’s advisory.”

Please go and consider voting for our Starter!

And, if you have a Conversation Starter or Ignite Session, please share details in the comments.

And remember, you have to be an ALA member; and voting is open until the end of March.